research and other wanderings - see my website! There are comics and a store and everything: Hark! A Vagrant
drewweing:

Twenty three pages in, we finally get to see the title character. (via The Creepy Casefiles of Margo Maloo | Updates Tuesdays and Thursdays)

There’s a lot more story here now!  A beautifully done comic.

drewweing:

Twenty three pages in, we finally get to see the title character.
(via The Creepy Casefiles of Margo Maloo | Updates Tuesdays and Thursdays)

There’s a lot more story here now!  A beautifully done comic.

discardingimages:

cat with eyebrowsJean Mansel, ‘La Fleur des histoires ou les hystores rommaines abregies…’, France 1454.
Paris, Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal, Ms 5088 réserve, fol. 257r

discardingimages:

cat with eyebrows

Jean Mansel, ‘La Fleur des histoires ou les hystores rommaines abregies…’, France 1454.

Paris, Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal, Ms 5088 réserve, fol. 257r

clairewatchestelly:

I really love John Allison’s Tackleford tales and I wrote a bit about why, specifically “reviewing” The Case of the Team Spirit, the first volume of Bad Machinery, published by Oni Press

(via scarygoround)

The Elements of Style - useful for all of us from time to time

The Elements of Style - useful for all of us from time to time

oystercakes:

beatonna:

Anyone interested in words and turns of phrase will enjoy this book-
South Shore Phrase Book: A New, Revised and Expanded Nova Scotia Dictionary
First published in the 1980s, it has a lot of gems in it.  Along the south shore of Nova Scotia, you’ll find a lot of New England-y holdovers and the like, or German words around Lunenburg, or etc.  
I do know (as to the selection above) that when there was no booze around, people drank vanilla flavour bottles from the grocery, which was easier to get.  Also, old ladies drank (some still do, according to a friend) vanilla so as not to appear buying something so crude as liquor.  Old ladies!  Beer ain’t so bad.

I will add some only tangentially-related stuff to this! During Prohibition it’s true that some people turned to cooking extracts. Unfortunately, many of these contained ethanol. In order to prevent Jamaica ginger extract—which was often produced and distributed as a ‘patent medicine’—from being sought out for recreational use the US government required an elevated solids content; this would result in a bitter, unpalatable beverage.

Of course, folks drank ‘jake’ (as it was called) anyway. This caused paralysis, loss of limbs, and death in many cases, disproportionately in immigrants and the lower class. This was the inspiration for such songs as Jake Leg Blues, Jake Walk Blues, and Jake Liquor Blues. (Audio recordings in links.)

interesting and informative addition! 

oystercakes:

beatonna:

Anyone interested in words and turns of phrase will enjoy this book-

South Shore Phrase Book: A New, Revised and Expanded Nova Scotia Dictionary

First published in the 1980s, it has a lot of gems in it.  Along the south shore of Nova Scotia, you’ll find a lot of New England-y holdovers and the like, or German words around Lunenburg, or etc.  

I do know (as to the selection above) that when there was no booze around, people drank vanilla flavour bottles from the grocery, which was easier to get.  Also, old ladies drank (some still do, according to a friend) vanilla so as not to appear buying something so crude as liquor.  Old ladies!  Beer ain’t so bad.

I will add some only tangentially-related stuff to this! During Prohibition it’s true that some people turned to cooking extracts. Unfortunately, many of these contained ethanol. In order to prevent Jamaica ginger extract—which was often produced and distributed as a ‘patent medicine’—from being sought out for recreational use the US government required an elevated solids content; this would result in a bitter, unpalatable beverage.

Of course, folks drank ‘jake’ (as it was called) anyway. This caused paralysis, loss of limbs, and death in many cases, disproportionately in immigrants and the lower class. This was the inspiration for such songs as Jake Leg Blues, Jake Walk Blues, and Jake Liquor Blues. (Audio recordings in links.)

interesting and informative addition! 

newfoundlandfolkways:

The Viking (1931)
An epic melodrama set amidst the Newfoundland seal cull

Directed by George Melford (of silent film fame) and introduced by Sir Wilfred Grenfell, this Newfoundland-American co-production is often considered “one of the most important Canadian films ever made” (National Archives of Canada). The Viking is an epic Hollywood-style drama that loosely adapts tragic events from the turn of the century, where hundreds of brave Newfoundland men lost their lives during their annual seal culls. It follows a conflict between two rural men out to sea and onto the ice floes where they settle their differences for good and all.

The dramatic elements are a little goofy at times, mainly due to the strange adaptation of the island’s language and accents, but there are some incredibly beautiful scenes set on the ice floes and sealing vessels. Not to mention the wonderful shots of a snow-covered Quidi Vidi. The film, which was originally named White Thunder, is widely known to be the first to make use of location sound recording (especially in Canada). Sadly, while filming additional scenes, producer Varick Frissell and two-dozen other crew members aboard the SS Viking were killed from an explosion.

This is the classic film in its entirety, finally available for public viewing online. We do not own this title in any way, we are simply making the only digitized copy available for cultural purposes.

Justin Oakey is a filmmaker and avid outdoorsman born and raised in Newfoundland whose work reflects his passion for the rich history and traditions of his island.

Maurice du Saxe - Charles-François Dumouriez - Gilbert du Motier de La Fayette - François Marceau Lazare Hoche - Jean-Baptiste Kléber - Louis Charles Antoine Desaix - Jean Lannes Joachim Murat - André Masséna- Nicolas Jean-de-Dieu Soult - Michel Ney

lecomtesanstete:

Gallery of great French officers (pt. 2), Imagerie Pellerin, 1860.

(x)

time to go shopping part 2?

(via frenchhistory)

willigula:

Under Allied Flags, a series of covers for Hearst’s Magazine showing women wearing uniforms of the allied nations, 1917

(via carlylehold via beautifulcentury)

time to go shopppinnnngggg

(via wahnwitzig)

russian-style:

Savely Sorin - Anna Pavlova
Anna Pavlova is one of the most famous and greatest ballet dancers. She took part in Diaghelev’s Seasons and later with her own ballet company. A friend to many royalties and celebrities, she was best known for her role of the Dying Swan.

I dig this painting style

russian-style:

Savely Sorin - Anna Pavlova

Anna Pavlova is one of the most famous and greatest ballet dancers. She took part in Diaghelev’s Seasons and later with her own ballet company. A friend to many royalties and celebrities, she was best known for her role of the Dying Swan.

I dig this painting style

Let some kids show you that history is adorrabblleeee
But also inspiring and great, and I bet these kids are going to make you google a few names you didn’t know before!  And they seem to be ever expanding in content.  
I like the t-shirts too.  You can follow Because Of Them We Can on facebook, here.

Let some kids show you that history is adorrabblleeee

But also inspiring and great, and I bet these kids are going to make you google a few names you didn’t know before!  And they seem to be ever expanding in content.  

I like the t-shirts too.  You can follow Because Of Them We Can on facebook, here.

Anyone interested in words and turns of phrase will enjoy this book-
South Shore Phrase Book: A New, Revised and Expanded Nova Scotia Dictionary
First published in the 1980s, it has a lot of gems in it.  Along the south shore of Nova Scotia, you’ll find a lot of New England-y holdovers and the like, or German words around Lunenburg, or etc.  
I do know (as to the selection above) that when there was no booze around, people drank vanilla flavour bottles from the grocery, which was easier to get.  Also, old ladies drank (some still do, according to a friend) vanilla so as not to appear buying something so crude as liquor.  Old ladies!  Beer ain’t so bad.

Anyone interested in words and turns of phrase will enjoy this book-

South Shore Phrase Book: A New, Revised and Expanded Nova Scotia Dictionary

First published in the 1980s, it has a lot of gems in it.  Along the south shore of Nova Scotia, you’ll find a lot of New England-y holdovers and the like, or German words around Lunenburg, or etc.  

I do know (as to the selection above) that when there was no booze around, people drank vanilla flavour bottles from the grocery, which was easier to get.  Also, old ladies drank (some still do, according to a friend) vanilla so as not to appear buying something so crude as liquor.  Old ladies!  Beer ain’t so bad.

Examples of work and flawless colors from Tadahiro Uesugi

The Story of Paul Bunyon - great prints by the legendary Ed Emberley

A Winter Too Long

The first of a few documentaries featuring resilient farmer Hannah Hauxwell

More of Hannah here, in the follow up documentary, A Winter Too Many.

The Joy of Country - I liked this overview of country music history