research and other wanderings - see my website! There are comics and a store and everything: Hark! A Vagrant

La Commune (Paris, 1871) Another Peter Watkins for you.  I had to turn the english captions on, FYI.  From Rotten Tomatoes:

Noted filmmaker and media critic Peter Watkins directs this mammoth six-hour-long look at the legendary Paris Commune of 1871. Following the humiliating defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian War, the reign of Napoleon III collapsed in the resulting public foment. While a new regime headed under the Government of National Defense tried to shore up power, a band of commoners took the reigns of power for themselves and created the Paris Commune, a government defiantly separate from the state operating under a sort of proto-Marxist ethos. Inevitably, the Commune was brutally suppressed by French troops. Watkins’ treatment of the event juxtaposes the present with the past — modern day CNN-style reporting with historical fact. 

sovietpostcards:

Drawing by K. Zotov, 1968 (by katya.)

Nothing like a mouse party around a wheat

sovietpostcards:

Drawing by K. Zotov, 1968 (by katya.)

Nothing like a mouse party around a wheat

Sunday Night Ghost Stories

beautiful work

Beach time!  Click through for old timey summer.
A+ use of props.  Sit in the bucket!

Beach time!  Click through for old timey summer.

A+ use of props.  Sit in the bucket!

I put this up when I started this tumblr, but that video was taken down.  Peter Watkins’ 1964 documentary Culloden is fantastic, with the “on site” interviews/quotes, explanations of who people were, why they were there, and what the battle meant to them.  It was a groundbreaking production, read more about it here.

r-dart:

A friend drew me a mermaid, so I drew one back.

r-dart:

A friend drew me a mermaid, so I drew one back.

toffany:

Revisiting a beautiful girl I saw on a bus stop a few years ago. I’ll be making artwork to celebrate the beauty of black youth - Blackness isn’t dangerous or ugly, and this is how I experience and see blackness todayRIP Michael Brown

Follow all of Tiffany’s beautiful drawings!  

toffany:

Revisiting a beautiful girl I saw on a bus stop a few years ago. I’ll be making artwork to celebrate the beauty of black youth - Blackness isn’t dangerous or ugly, and this is how I experience and see blackness today

RIP Michael Brown

Follow all of Tiffany’s beautiful drawings!  

Quinn Keast has made a delightful and innovative use of my comic, give it a try!

Quinn Keast has made a delightful and innovative use of my comic, give it a try!

I watched this program recently - The Machine Gun and Skye’s Band of Brothers, part of the WWI programming BBC has on the go this year.  Many people from my area can trace themselves back to Skye, and it was quite affecting to hear names on this show that are fully the same as names of my neighbours, in a different time and place.  An historian named Beaton even makes an appearance.  What do you know, eh?

Newfoundland’s natural cuisine

fashionsfromhistory:

Colcha
1786
Mexico (New Spain)
MET

look at this here charm

fashionsfromhistory:

Colcha

1786

Mexico (New Spain)

MET

look at this here charm

historicaltimes:

Benjamin Baker illustrating the structural principles of suspended span cantilever bridges - dated between 1882~1904

historicaltimes:

Benjamin Baker illustrating the structural principles of suspended span cantilever bridges - dated between 1882~1904

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Bhāskarāchārya

[x], [x]

Bhāskarāchārya / Bhāskara II (1114–1185) was an Indian mathematician and astronomer.

Among his many achievements are the following:

1. He was the first person to explain that when you divide by zero, the result is infinity.

2. He was also the first person to note that a positive number has two square roots - a positive and a negative one.

3. He described the principles of differential calculus 500 years before Leibniz and Newton. (He definitively came up with Rolle’s theorem half a millennium before Rolle himself.)

4. He calculated the length of the rotation of the earth around the sun to 365.2588 days - he was just off by 3 minutes.

Intriguingly, his treatise on arithmetic and geometry, Līlāvatī, is named after his daughter. He addresses her as an eager student:

Oh Līlāvatī, intelligent girl, if you understand addition and subtraction, tell me the sum of the amounts 2, 5, 32, 193, 18, 10, and 100, as well as [the remainder of] those when subtracted from 10000.” and “Fawn-eyed child Līlāvatī, tell me, how much is the number [resulting from] 135 multiplied by 12, if you understand multiplication by separate parts and by separate digits. And tell [me], beautiful one, how much is that product divided by the same multiplier?

These invocations have led some to surmise that Līlāvatī, too, was a mathematician.

Image from here: http://mathdept.ucr.edu/pdf/iwm1.pdf

Story of her introduction to math here: http://4go10tales.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/lilavati.html

Wikipedia on Bhaskaracharya

well my math teacher never talked to me that way

artschoolglasses:

Military uniform detail

you like it

you do

(via lostsplendor)

I listened to the very well done episode of This American Life, Little War on the Prairie (recommended!), and was reminded to watch Dakota 38 - I saw a trailer for it, ages ago, and filed it away.